Camellia Japonica
  • Camellia japonicas and cultivars originate from Asia and Japan.
  • Camellia japonicas were introduced to Australia in 1826 by Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay.
  • He planted the first plants at Elizabeth Bay House in the eastern suburbs.
  • William Macarthur [ son of John Macarthur ] commenced planting and propagating Camellia japonicas at Camden Park in 1831.
  • Some of those plants are still growing to this day and are in fact the oldest camellias in Australia.
  • There are today thousands of varieties well suited to Australian conditions.
  • Camellia japonica and cultivars are excellent as garden plants as well as for commercial projects,
  • They can be used as, specimen, screen and tub plants, some can also be trained for espalier and some can be trained to become standards.
  • Camellia japonica and cultivars have, during winter, the most showy profusion of long flowering blooms, in all sizes, shapes and colours.
  • They have a handsome evergreen foliage.
  • Camellia japonica and cultivars are not affected by many pests and / or diseases.
  • They require minimal maintenance when compared with other shrubs.
  • Camellia japonica and cultivar’s root system will not damage pipes, paths, fences and foundations.
  • They live much longer than most native plants and they do not grow out of shape.